An Inventory Of Live Animals Being Sold On Amazon.com

  • Ladybugs – 1,500 per order. Can Devour Up To 50 Aphids A Day. $11.49
  • Crickets – 1,000 per order. One inch long. $25.99
  • Gutloaded Mealworms – 500 per order. Packed full or calcium and other essential nutrients. $9.99
  • Small Dubia Cockroach 100 per order. Can’t fly, climb smooth surfaces, or make any annoying noises. $16.99
  • Littleneck Clams – 100 per order. Don’t have necks. $64.19
  • Trapdoor Snails – 50 per order. Hardy. Trapdoor snails do not attack plants. $103.70
  • Adult Delphastus – 25 per order. Will Stay In The Area After They Are Released. $21.99
  • Oysters 24 per order. Ready to shuck. $39.99
  • Soft Shell Crab – 12 per order. The actual shedding of the shell can take anywhere from one to three hours. $36.00
  • Freshwater Cherry Shrimp – 12 per order. Includes both males and females (mostly females). $26.33
  • New England Lobster – 2 per order. Four to six pounds. $122.24
  • African Dwarf Frogs – 2 per order. Hours of fun. $39.95

  • Noteworthy Tumblr #5: Table For One

    Table For One is simple. It has a white background, photos of people eating alone, a title, and that’s about it. However, it elicits some strong feelings from people.

    The tumblr didn’t evoke any negative emotions from me, maybe because I eat alone so often. I enjoy eating by myself. You can’t forget that just because you are at a table for one, it doesn’t mean you are alone.


    Photo credit: Jerry Hsu

    Boulder, Colorado: America’s Foodiest Town

    According to Bon Appétit, this years award for the foodiest town goes to Boulder, Colorado. The criteria for the award are as follows:

    Our criteria for the annual report on “America’s Foodiest Town”: Small (fewer than 250,000 people), quality farmers’ markets, concerned farmers, dedicated food media, first-rate restaurants, talented food artisans, and a community of food lovers.

    Durham-Chapel Hill, North Carolina and Portland, Maine were the winners of the 2008 and 2009 awards respectively. Boulder restaurants mentioned in the article include:
    Dish Gourmet
    The Kitchen
    Salt
    Frasca Food and Wine
    Pizzeria Basta
    Mateo
    The Boulder Dushanbe Teahouse
    Leaf
    Café Aion
    Kim & Jake’s Cakes
    Happy
    Sushi Tora
    Boulder County Farmers’ Market
    Mountain Sun Pub & Brewery

    The Twitter Of Recipes

    Mark Bittman has another “101” recipe list out. This time it’s 101 Fast Recipes for Grilling.

    These recipes are excellent for their simplicity and ease. You’re not going to open a restaurant or win any cooking contests with these recipes, but they they will satisfy your taste-buds, tummy, and busy schedule. Previous 101 lists from Bittman:
    Simple Salads
    Head Starts on the Day
    Inspired Picnics [previously]
    Simple Appetizers[previously]
    Quick Meals (10 more) [previously]

    If you enjoyed any of the recipes linked above, I have been told that Mark Bittman’s “How To Cook Everything: Simple Recipes For Great Food” is a worthwhile cookbook.

    The Menu At Casa Bonita

    A bunch of people come to Artifacting looking for the Casa Bonita menu. So in the interest of pleasing the masses, here you go (click on the pictures for larger versions):

    Check out this post if your interested in what the food at Casa Bonita looks like.

    15 Delicious Wine Pairing Suggestions

    Wine rules are more like the pirate’s code: more of a set of guidelines.There’s considerable room for experimentation and expression of your own personality in pairing food and wine. The rules for wine pairing have relaxed a bit, but the fact remains that certain flavors of food and wine mix better together than others. Remember, rules are meant to be broken and the best pairings are the ones that bring you joy.

    Syrah: Matches with highly spiced dishes
    When a meat is heavily seasoned—like Asian-Spiced Pork Shoulder and Cumin-Spiced Burgers—look for a red wine with lots of spicy notes. Syrah from Washington, Cabernet Franc from France and Xinomavro from Greece are all nice choices.

    Grüner Veltliner: Pairs with dishes that have lots of fresh herbs
    Austrian Grüner Veltliner’s citrus-and-clover scent is lovely when there are lots of fresh herbs in a dish. Other go-to grapes in a similar style include Albariño from Spain and Vermentino from Italy.

    Pinot Noir: Is great for dishes with earthy flavors
    Recipes made with ingredients like mushrooms and truffles taste great with reds like Pinot Noir and Dolcetto, which are light-bodied but full of savory depth.

    Dry Rosé: For rich, cheesy dishes
    Some cheeses go better with white wine, some with red; yet almost all pair well with dry rosé, which has the acidity of white wine and the fruit character of red. This makes it the go-to wine when serving a wide range of hors d’oeuvres, from crudités to gougères.

    Sauvignon Blanc: Goes with tart dressings and sauces
    Tangy foods—like Scallops with Grapefruit-Onion Salad or Sour-Orange Yucatán Chicken—won’t overwhelm zippy wines like Sauvignon Blanc, Vinho Verde from Portugal and Verdejo from Spain. The bright, citrusy acidity acts like a zap of lemon or lime juice to heighten flavors in everything from smoked sablefish to grilled salmon.

    Zinfandel: For pâtés, mousses and terrines
    If you can use the same adjectives to describe a wine and a dish, the pairing will often work. For instance, the words rustic and rich describe Zinfandel, Italy’s Nero d’Avola and Spain’s Monastrell as well as Creamy Chicken-Liver Mousse.

    Pinot Grigio: Pairs with light fish dishes
    Light seafood dishes, like Seafood Tostada Bites, seem to take on more flavor when matched with equally delicate white wines, such as Pinot Grigio or Arneis from Italy or Chablis from France.

    Malbec: Won’t be overshadowed by sweet-spicy barbecue sauces
    Malbec, Shiraz and Côtes-du-Rhône are big and bold enough to drink with foods brushed with heavily spiced barbecue sauces like Chicken Drumsticks with Asian Barbecue Sauce

    Chardonnay: For fatty fish or fish in a rich sauce
    Silky whites—for instance, Chardonnays from California, Chile or Australia—are delicious with fish like salmon or any kind of seafood in a lush sauce. Try Sizzling Shrimp Scampi or Crisp Salmon with Avocado Salad.

    Cabernet Sauvignon: Is fabulous with juicy red meat
    California Cabernet, Bordeaux and Bordeaux-style blends are terrific with steaks or chops. The firm tannins, the astringent compounds in these red wines that help give the wine structure, refresh the palate after each bite of meat.

    Champagne: Is perfect with anything salty
    Most dry sparkling wines, such as brut Champagne and Spanish cava, actually have a faint touch of sweetness. That makes them extra-refreshing when served with salty foods.

    Rosé Champagne: Is great with dinner, not just hors d’oeuvres
    Rosé sparkling wines, such as rosé Champagne, cava and sparkling wine from California, have the depth of flavor and richness to go with a wide range of main courses.

    Off-Dry Riesling: Pairs with sweet & spicy dishes
    The slight sweetness of many Rieslings, Gewürztraminers and Vouvrays helps tame the heat of spicy Asian and Indian dishes. In addition, when confronted with dishes like a fiery curried chicken or Thai stir-fry, wines that are low in alcohol keep the oils that make food hot from being overly accentuated.

    Old World Wines: Are intrinsically good with Old World dishes
    The flavors of foods and wines that have grown up together over the centuries—Tuscan recipes and Tuscan wines, for instance—are almost always a natural fit.

    Moscato d’Asti: Loves fruit desserts
    Moderately sweet sparkling wines such as Moscato d’Asti, demi-sec Champagne and Asti Spumante help emphasize the fruit in the dessert, rather than the sugar.

    This was (mostly) stolen directly from Food & Wine and reprinted here so you don’t have to click 15 times to see it all. If you are looking for more specific pairings check out the table at Gourmet Sleuth.

    The Food At Casa Bonita

    You’re right, nobody goes to Casa Bonita for the food. But because buying a meal is mandatory for entrance, nobody goes to Casa Bonita without the food. Long heralded as the worst Mexican food in Denver, the dinners and lunches at Casa Bonita have become a legend in themselves. Below is a picture of the combination meal that I ordered a couple of weeks ago. Does it really look all that bad? Rest assured it tasted nearly exactly like it looks. Horrible.

    Is It Really That Bad? The food at Casa Bonita

    Other photos from my trip to Casa Bonita can be found in this flickr set.