Enhance Old Station

Zoom In. Now… Enhance! (For Real, Kinda)

The Zoom And Enhance trope has long been the ultimate criminal identification solution and a staple for crime drama television. Its use on screen is often lauded as an example of how Hollywood doesn’t understand technology. The Enhance Button trope simply ignores that the blurry focus and big blocky pixels you get when you zoom in close on an image are the only information that the picture actually contains, and attempting to extract more detail from the image alone is essentially impossible.

Enhance Old Station

Enhance Bank Lobby

However, as a proof of concept, Alex J. Champandard’s Neural Enhance coding project uses deep learning to enhance the details of images. As seen from the gifs above, if the neural networks are well trained, the enhancements are quite effective.

Thanks to deep learning and #NeuralEnhance, it’s now possible to train a neural network to zoom into your images at 2x or even 4x. You’ll get even better results by increasing the number of neurons or training with a dataset similar to your low-resolution image. The catch? The neural network is hallucinating details based on its training from example images. It’s not reconstructing your photo exactly as it would have been if it was HD. That’s only possible in Holywood — but using deep learning as “Creative AI” works and it’s just as cool!

Now let’s vector in and enlarge the z-axis.

via prosthetic knowledge

What’s Not To Like?

I definitely like this:

I Like What I See is a Chrome extension to automatically click all “Like” links on Facebook. When you visit Facebook, click the thumbs up in the extension bar and start scrolling and liking. Liking and scrolling. Every instance of the word “Like” will be clicked. Don’t worry, Facebook is a fun place full of all of the stuff you like.

I liked what I saw when I saw Steven Klise’s “I Like what I See” Chrome extension. You might like it to, so I packaged it up for your easy consumption.

  1. First click here to download the extension.
  2. Open your Chrome Extension Manager (by typing chrome://extensions into your address bar)
  3. Drag the file you downloaded in step one onto your extension page.
  4. Click Add

Sriracha Rooster Drawn Entirely In HTML5 Canvas

The Sriracha Rooster below is rendered entirely in browser. It’s not a gif, jpeg or other image format. I created it using the HTML5 Canvas element, Javascript, and a ton of code.



If you are using Internet Explorer you will have to be updated to version 9 in order to see the image element to work. View the page source code to see exactly how I did it.

Google Alarm

It’s no secret that Google is monitoring and recording tons of personal information and documenting your surfing habits as you cruise around the internet. Gmail, Google Analytics, Google AdSense, YouTube embeds, API calls… all of this data can be used to monitor & track your personal web browsing habits

The fine folks over at F.A.T. Labs have created a firefox add-on and chrome extension that visually and audibly alert you to whenever your personal information is being sent to Google servers. It also keeps running stats that give you the percentage of sites you have recently visited. Downloads of the add-on/extension can be found below:



No-sound version (workplace-friendly)

is also available: click to install



UPDATE: Chrome extension now available (beta): click to install


A video showing the plugin working is posted below. If you’re interested in building on-top of this extension, you can find the MIT Licensed source code on github. More information can be found on jamiedubs.com.
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Code Organ

Code Organ takes the code of any website and turns it into music.

Code Organ works by choosing the key of the song based on how many times the letter designating that note appears in a web page’s source code, using a minor key if it appears an odd number of times or major if it’s even. It then picks one of ten synthesiser sounds based on which characters appear the most times in a page. Finally, the algorithm decides which drum loop to use by weighing the ratio of text characters to actual notes.

Artifacting ends up sounding like this.