Brook Shields And Stiv Bators

Brooke Shields And Punk Rock

This photo of H.R., lead singer of Bad Brains, smoking weed with a supposed Brooke Shields has been circling the internet like crazy the last couple of days.

Brooke Shields And H.R. Smoking WeedPhoto Courtesy of @davehill77

Although it would be incredible if this really happened, I’m sorry to say I’m 99.9% sure that isn’t really Brooke Shields. Which is too bad because it would have been the best picture ever if it was. However, don’t be too let down, Brooke actually has some strong punk rock roots. First off, Brooke did have an actual photo shoot with punk originator Stiv Bators, lead singer of the Dead Boys.

The above interview from Efrom Allen’s Underground TV was taken during the photo shoot with Stiv Bators. It aired on Manhattan Cable’s public access channel in the 1970s. The 12-year-old Brooke Shields actually gets a little flirty with the American punk rock innovator.

Furthering her punk rock roots, Shields opens up Agent Orange’s song ‘Bloodstain’ for the ‘Rondey On The ROQ Volume 1’ compilation. The album also includes rougher versions songs from the Circle Jerks, U.X.A., Black Flag, and Circle Jerks. Have a listen: Agent Orange – Bloodstains

Brooke Shields And Stiv Bators

Photo courtesy of astralsilence

A Three Doc Night

I watched three short documentaries last night.

The first film was a documentary about the rise and fall of Rollen Stewart, the rainbow man. You may not recognize the name but if you’re my age or older, you might remember his rainbow hair dancing around at every nfl, nba, mlb game in the late seventies. The Rainbow Man/John 3:16 was a strange dude who also liked to smoke a lot of dooby. His meteoric rise to semi-fame flew straight into a becoming a born again Christian after being groped by a bunch of professional cheerleaders (huh?). At this point he started to hang his John 3:16 signs (For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life) everywhere he went, which was wherever there was a television camera. I remember him more for the giant John 3:16 signs made of bed sheets than and only have foggy memories of a dancing prism with an afro. Like lots of born again’s (George Bush Jr. comes to mind), John’s grip on reality started to slip and he decided that the rapture was just around the corner. Well, desperate time call for desperate measures and he ended up taking a maid hostage in a downtown Los Angeles hotel and smoking more weed (no harm to the maid). He has since been sentenced to life in prison. It was a really interesting film with too much stock footage from Hard Copy tha ultimately ended up being sorta sad.

Rollen Frederick Stewart courtesy of Sports Illustrated Still Image from the film

The second film I watched was The Making of ‘Ladies and Gentlemen, the Fabulous Stains’ about the cult favorite Ladies and Gentlemen, the Fabulous Stains which I have never seen but now desperately want to. If anyone knows how to get a hold of this movie please contact me. The original movie starred young 14 year old Diane Lane, and was her first film. Other notable actors included member of The Sex Pistols, members of The Clash, the lead singer of The Tubes, and Black Randy and his band, The Metrosquad. Needless to say, there were all sorts of drugs, sex, and rock and roll happening all over the set. Good times! I’m dying to see Ladies and Gentlemen, the Fabulous Stains. It looks like one of the best and one of the worst movies of all times. Here is a youtube clip I found.

The third documentary I watched was Pie Fight ’69 which was a weird, eight-minute, documentary about a pretty weird event. The film consisted of footage lost since 1969 of the notorious ‘pie-fight’ incident at the San Francisco Film Festival. Two dozen costumed radicals descend on the fancy black tie & red carpet festival with one fully laden pie truck and six cameras in order to wreak havoc. The coolest thing about this was the term “soft bomb” which seems like the 1969 version of a “flash mob” with political intent (what in the late sixties didn’t have political intent?).