Colorful/Super Moon


Photo credit: Noel Carboni

The image above, click it for a wallpaper sized version, is a composite of 15 exposures digitally stitched together. According to photographer Noel Carboni:

Looking through the viewfinder I swept across the surface in a zig-zag fashion, trying for about 1/3 overlap between frames. I triggered the shutter with my TC80-N3 remote timer/controller. I did the stitching by hand in Photoshop.

Since it was taken at the camera’s most noise-free setting (ISO 100), the data is very accurate, and thus I was able to strongly increase the saturation via Photoshop’s Image – Adjust – Hue/Saturation function.

The fascinating color differences along the lunar surface are real, though highly exaggerated, corresponding to regions with different chemical compositions. And while these color differences are not visible to the eye even with a telescope, moon watchers can still see a dramatic lunar presentation tonight thanks to a fluke of orbital mechanics that brings the moon closer to Earth than that it has been in more than 18 years. At its peak, the supermoon of March 2011 may appear 14 percent larger and 30 percent brighter than lesser full moons. However, to the casual observer, it will probably be hard to tell the difference.

The Earth And Moon From Far Far Away

Photo courtesy of NASA

The photo above, of the Earth and the Moon, was taken by the robotic spacecraft MESSENGER from 183 Million kilometers (114 million miles) away. That is about the same distance away as the planet Mercury. The Earth and Moon are visible as the double spot on the lower left. The MESSENGER spacecraft is working its way to enter orbit around Mercury in March of 2011 (via Coudal Partners)

Libration

Today on Wednesday’s Wonderful World of Wikipedia is the concept ofLibration. In astronomy libration (from the Latin verb libro -are “to balance, to sway”, cf. libra “scales”) refers to the various orbital conditions which make it possible to see more than 50% of the moon’s surface over time, even though the front of the Moon is tidally locked to always face towards the earth. As the orbital processes are repetitive, libration is manifested as a slow rocking back and forth (or up and down) of the face of the orbital body as viewed from the parent body, much like the rocking of a pair of scales about the point of balance.
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Congratulations!!!

The Wedding Cake :: My brothers wedding :: Jefferson Island, LA

I spent most of last week in Louisiana celebrating the marriage of my brother and his Bride.

My brother is hitched. It’s hard to find words to describe how happy I am for the both of them. That’s part of the reason I slipped past doing my best man speech (which I now feel totally guilty about). I’d written it on the plane ride down there, I had the angle I was going to take outlined in my mind for months, I had it all written down and in my pocket ready to go. But when it came down to it, my nerves got the best of me and I failed to deliver. I handed the hand written speech to them after the wedding and told them to open it on the first night of their honeymoon. That made me feel a little better. Anyway, I wish everyone could have as much happiness and fun as they do together.

All of it was gorgeous. It was a great afternoon/evening/night of friends, family, and celebration. So much happened that it’s hard to remember it all. My brother and Pandy are two of the most important people in my life and I wish them the best of everything life has to offer.

Congratulations!!!

The sunset on Lake Peigneur :: My brothers wedding :: Jefferson Island, LA
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Bats In The Belfry Or How To Use The Internet For Making A Record Of Your Life


Corner Of 16th & Grant, Denver

Last night, while walking home from work, I noticed this eerie scene and it reminded me of how close we are actually getting to Halloween. The nearly full moon and the belfry of St. Paul Lutheran Church and the dead tree limbs sure created a spooky mood. My new little moon phases thing says that a full moon should be coming any day now. The bells in the belfry can be heard in my apartment. Sometimes their loud ringing is nice and they act as a pleasant type of alarm, other times they can simply be loud and headache inducing. This mostly depends on my mood, demeanor, and how much I drank the night before. I remember one morning when the bells played, to my surprise, Cat Steven’s “Morning Has Broken”. Back in June of this past summer I recorded those churchbells on my cell phone.